#4 – Case based learning, with Corne Postma

In this episode I speak to Corné Postma from the University of Pretoria. We discuss his PhD research where he looked at the use of case-based learning to develop clinical reasoning in undergraduate Dentistry students. Corné used both quantitative and qualitative data to determine that students’ clinical reasoning ability improved after using a case-based approach to learning.

Corné is an Associate Professor in the Department of Dental Management Sciences, School of Dentistry, at the University of Pretoria. He is a specialist in Community Dentistry by training and his primary teaching responsibility lies in the domain of Comprehensive Patient Care, which includes patient communication, patient administration, clinical reasoning and patient management. He is also involved in developing other non-clinical skills such as self-awareness, ethics, professionalism, leadership, team work and health advocacy skills in dental students.

Corné has a very broad clinical research interest, which correlates with the generalist requirement of Comprehensive Patient Care. He has a particular affinity for health professions education research, which is closely linked to the development of different kinds of soft skills in students. His research outputs can be viewed on Google Scholar. Corné is a SAFRI (Sub-Saharan African Foundation for the Advancement of International Medical Education and Research Regional Institute) as well as a TAU (Teaching Advancement at University) fellow.

Resources for this conversation


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WC Journal club: Clinical reasoning skills

On Thursday, 6th June (2013), the Western Cape regional SAAHE committee hosted their first journal club of 2013 at the Tygerberg campus of Stellenbosch University. The topic of the meeting was Clinical Reasoning and was presented by Professors Vanessa Burch (UCT) and Juanita Bezuidenhout (Stellenbosch).

We wanted to experiment with the use of technology to enable those who were unable to attend to also participate in some way. Unfortunately, we were unable to set up both the video or audio broadcast, and didn’t manage to record the audio for later download. However, we did get the Google Document set up, which enabled us to share the notes that were taken at the meeting. We hope that next time we’ll be able to add another aspect to the meeting that will further enable those who can’t attend to benefit from the group discussion – possibly a podcast of the audio. Please bear with us as we learn from our mistakes and continue to improve the service.

Here is the link to the shared document in Google Drive.

Readings:

  • Braude, H. (2013). Human all too human reasoning: Comparing clinical and phenomenological intuition. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, 38:173-189.
  • Charlin, B. et al. (2012). Clinical reasoning processes: Unravelling complexity through graphical representation. Medical Education, 46: 454-463.
  • Marcum, J. (2012). An integrated model of clinical reasoning: Dual process theory of cognition and metacognition. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 18: 954-961.